Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again

Hollywood’s biggest musical marvel is back with a new wave of sporadically cringeworthy sing-a-long hits.

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After the loss of her mother, Sophie decides to pursue her mother’s dream and renovate her hotel into a magical haven, but not all goes to plan when some unexpected guests make an appearance at the grand opening.

Though it seemed quite possible that all the ABBA hits had already been exhausted in the first film, this new installment shows just how wrong an assumption that was, as the old songs are recycled to showcase new stories.

Despite Meryl Streep not taking the lead role in this latest film, the cast members, new and old, seem to make for an equally enjoyable presence onscreen, as their talent radiates throughout, with the likes of Cher and Andy Garcia being added to the already star-studded cast.

Whilst this film holds all the same promise as the first, it does somewhat disappoint in terms of the plot dynamic, which tends to create confusion in place of satisfaction. Donna’s (Meryl Streep’s’) death, for instance, is carelessly overlooked as no explanation as to how and or why is provided.

The Mercy

An oceanic adventure that ends in a wave of merciless peril.

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Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth) is determined to be the first novice sailor to win the Golden Globe Race, but his admirable motivation soon becomes a distant memory when he finds himself alone on a yacht in the middle of the ocean with little hope of winning.

Despite being based upon the true tale of Crowhurst’s 1968 defeat, Director James Marsh reconstructs every inch of this dramatic demise with a touch of fictional elegance which allows for a fairytale discovery that leaves the historical facts trailing behind.

With Firth taking on such a delicate and somewhat lonely character, the expectation of emotional success could be comprised, but Firth manages to excel in this department by showcasing his tumultuous talent which radiates throughout the film, creating an unrelenting emotional connection between actor and audience.

Though at its core this film is riddled with sadness and defeat, it still stands as a testament to a man willing to risk everything to pursue his dream of adventure.

 

Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Entertainingly ridiculous, and yet not quite as good as its predecessor.

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Eggsy’s (Taron Egerton) back, and so apparently is Harry (Colin Firth), despite ending the last film with a gunshot wound to the head. A new crisis befalls them in this action-packed sequel, as they must take down a crazed drug lord (Juliann Moore) in an attempt to save the world. In other words, it’s business as usual for the Kingsman, with a little help from their American cousins; The Statesman.

As is the case with most sequels, this film lacks the mystery of the first, which makes for a very predictable storyline laced with lackluster plot turns. Yet, regardless of the stunted excitement, the star-studded cast put a tremendous amount of effort into uplifting this seemingly foreseeable storyline.

With an opening scene crammed fall of computer-generated warmth, the audience is repeatedly gifted with orchestrated action throughout the film, which in some ways makes up for the unimaginative plot that must be suffered.

 

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